It is hard for my kids to understand why they cannot have some of die-cast toy cars of the "Cars" [movie] collection because some cost more than others. There are a couple that cost $39 while the rest cost in the range of $4.95 – $14.95. The difference in price does not make much sense to adults either, but we understand that it's a marketing gimmick. But, our challenge is, how do you explain that to kids when all they see is a die-cast toy car from their favorite movie, and they just want to complete the Cars collection? How do you explain to a kid the concept of "expensiveness" – that is – "it is more expensive, therefore, you cannot have this one!"

Teaching children the value of money is more difficult in today's cashless culture where checking accounts, ATM cards and credit purchases are part of our every day life. So, it really becomes a necessity to teach our kids at an ealier age that "money does not grow on trees." This issue becomes even more challenging as children grow older, their expectations and peer pressure grow, and their techi toys become more expensive.

So, I set myself in search of parenting tips and bumped into this book, "Money Doesn't Grow on Trees: Teaching Your Kids the Value of a Buck" by Ellie Kay. It was rated with 5 stars by customer reviews in Amazon.com. There are some more to check out as well in www.kidsmoneystore.com. If some of you have read already one of listed books in this site, we would love your comments.

Your wallets will thank you, and guess who else too?

About The Author

My real job in life is raising my 3 kids and having a nice, healthy and active family life. Along the way, I realized that motherhood didn’t come with a manual and frequently asked questions so I had to learn my way through with the help and advice of other mothers and that is how I decided to start a blog about tips for busy moms, The Moms Buzz, a lifestyle blog about only the buzz that matters. Modern moms are busy busy, and whatever tips make our lives easier we are ready to try them, we don’t have the time to read and read lengthy advices, but we can certainly read 1-2-3-SOLVED. Adriana is also the founder of ModaPreviewInternational.com and an established fashion/portrait photographer.

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3 Responses

  1. Odesk Provider

    I would also recommend the entire series “Finance for Kidz” by Prof Prakash Dheeriya. He makes everything simple and easy to understand. Even my 7 year old now understands the concept of inflation and deflation. No one has done a better job than him in explaining concepts such as risk and return, identity theft etc.
    I highly recommend that series. You can get it at http://www.finance4kidz.com
    Joanna

    Reply
  2. TheMomsBuzz

    Hello Joanna,
    DO you represent this book? I was going to ask if you could send us a copy for review. Let me know.
    Adriana @ TheMomsBuzz.com

    Reply
  3. grow up

    I would read a book that provides professional advice on how to teach kids about money and saving. Most parents rely on common sense and basic comparisons when trying to persuade their children why they cannot have this or that toy (we get the toy, no food that day since there won’t be money left). At some point though kids stop believing you, thinking that you are just bluffing.

    Reply

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